"An Association Of Life Savers And Care Givers That Served In Post world War II"

"We meet annually to reminisce, renew old friendships, establish new relationships, and most importantly, to preserve our history of service to the United States of America".

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"Our 15th Reunion is in Rapid City, SD,  8-11 September, 2010. ! We Hope To See You There.

"This site is dedicated to the outstanding contribnutions made by the men and women of the United States Army Medical Command Japan."

 

US Army Hospital, Camp Zama

The ancestral unit of USAH, CZ was the 128th Station Hospital, It was activated at Camp Beale, CA on 20 December, 1942. It saw action in New Guinea and the Philippines, and arrived in Japan in September, 1945.

On 26 September, 1945, the unit accepted the surrender of Japanese Military Hospital, Sagami-Ono and became the first US Army Hospital established in Japan. The 128th admitted it's first American patient on 13 October, 1945.

The hospital served with distinction during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. It In 1966, it was enlarged to 500 beds and designated as US Army Hospital, Honshu. In that capacity, it served as the Army Burn Center of the Far East. The hospital received a Meritorious Unit Commendation for it's service during the Vietnam era.

In November, 1979, the hospital facility closed and relocated to become an ambulatory care clinic on nearby Camp Zama.

 

US Army Hospital - Camp Zama, Japan

U.S Army Hospital, Sendai

 

U.S Army Hospital, Sendai

(172nd Station Hospital)

Before the 172nd came to Japan, after the war had ended in 1945, the unit had served at Camp Tasman in Brisbane, Australia. When the 172nd set up in Japan, they moved into the same building that housed Headquarters, IX Corps in Sendai. The building had been a Japanese Postal (Employees) Insurance Headquarters and was the only suitable building left for this purpose due to the bombing raids that had taken place in and around Sendai.

The 172nd deactivated in 1953, but the building was used by the 8166th Army Hospital in 1954, and it also housed the 11th Evacuation Hospital for a short time. The 172nd experienced a fire in 1947 that caused extensive damage to the hospital building. It was extensively remodeled and still stands today. Photo shows the remodeled hospital building as it is today. It was returned to the Japanese after the Vietnam era subsided.

128th Station Hospital


Our ancestral unit (the 128th Station Hospital) was activated at Camp Beale, California on 20 Dec 42. In Jan 44, the 8169th sailed for New Guinea, saw action in the Philippines, and was part of the invasion fleet targeted for the Japanese mainland (which fortunately was never needed). On 2 Sep 45, most of the unit's equipment was lost when LST 1106 sank in a typhoon off the coast of Japan. 1. On 26 Sep 45, the unit (now the 128th Station Hospital) accepted the surrender of the Japanese Military Hospital, Sagami- Ono and became the first U.S. Army Hospital established in Japan. The 128th admitted its first American patient on 13 Oct 45.  The hospital served with distinction during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. In 1966, it was enlarged to 500 beds and designated as U.S. Army Hospital, Honshu. In that capacity, it served as the Army Burn Center of the Far East. The hospital received a Meritorious Unit Commendation for its service during the Vietnam era.

 

 

Aerial View 1952

 

Testing for anthrax

Anthrax culture

406th Medical General Laboratory 1960

406th Medical General Laboratory

The 406th Medical General Laboratory at Camp Zama, was the central Laboratory for the Far East. It began operation in 1946 in Yokohama, with a floor space of about 3,300 square feet. Ten years later, on 6 February, 1956, the Laboratory occupied a new modern concrete building in an area of several acres, situated 30 miles from Tokyo, 15 miles from Yokohama, and 3 miles from the Headquarters of the United States Army, Japan. The buildings were partially air-conditioned and contained about 75,000 square feet. The main Laboratory building was 300 feet long, 50 feet wide, and 31/2 stories high. Connected to the second floor level was an unclosed ramp with a smaller two-story administration building attached. An aviary, blood storage and shipping building, a medical supply warehouse, an animal house, and an incinerator were also in the area.

The 406th was activated on 10 May, 1946 with personnel and equipment from the 3rd and 26th Medical Laboratories. The Laboratory stayed only four months in Yokohama. For the most of the next ten years, the Laboratory's existence was spent in a three story brick building in downtown, Tokyo, which formerly had housed officers of the Mitsubishi Company. The Tokyo building occupied about 27,000 square feet, but when the Korean War escalated, some departments expanded into a building next door. When the units moved into their new buildings at Camp Zama all the professional departments were housed in the main building.                   

US Army Medical Activity, Japan

BG Crawford F. Sams Health Clinic

In November, 1979, the hospital facility at Sagami-Ono closed and relocated to become an ambulatory care clinic on nearby, Camp Zama. In 1983, the unit was re-designated as US Army Medical Activity, Japan (MEDDAC-J) and now serves as the sole Army medical treatment facility supporting the US Army, Japan and the 9th Theatre Support Command.

In March, 1999, MEDDAC-J received a full three-year accreditation from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations (JCAHO). It has received a renewed three-year accreditation each period since.

MEDDAC-J operates as a free ambulatory care facility and is part of the Pacific Regional Medical Command with Headquarters at Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii.

On 14 April, 2006, USAMEDDAC-Japan Army Health Clinic was formally renamed the BG Crawford F. Sams US Army Health Clinic.

 

 

Camp Zama Health Clinic

 

Former U.S Army Hospital, Okinawa

Now, US Navy Regional Medical Center

 

 

US Army Hospital, Okinawa

After World War II, military hospital facilities on Okinawa, originally isolated field hospitals, were organized into a strip of Quanset huts. The huts were situated in present day Ginowan City, and known as Camp Mercy Hospital. The medical center actively supported world forces during the various conflicts and continued to sustain readiness for troops stationed on the island. In 1954, construction began on the US Army Hospital at Camp Kawae. This modern 250-bed US Army Hospital was a source of pride to the military, as well as, the Okinawan people. It was commissioned in 1958 and eventually expanded to a 700-bed facility to provide medical treatment for military members carrying out campaigns throughout the Pacific.

Negotiations began in March of 1976 for the transfer of the hospital from the US Army to the US Navy and from October, 1976 until it's commissioning as the United States Navy Regional Medical Center on 28 February, 1977, Army and Navy personnel jointly staffed the facility.

628th Medical Illustration Detachment

 

The 628th Medical Illustration Detachment was attached to the 406th Medical General Laboratory. The unit contributed greatly to the the continuing education of physicians and nursing personnel assigned to the Medical Command. This group of talented artists produced an array of anatomy charts and posters to aid the instructors and helped the command  achieve accreditation of it's hospitals and health care facilities.  Through their artistic efforts, it could be said that they drew what could not be seen, watched what had never been done before and told thousands about it without saying a word.

 

They had the uncanny ability of creating medical illustrations that simplified the most complex medical concepts and human anatomy to a lay audience. The exhibits of this talented bunch allowed the experts to easily describe complex concepts and human anatomy in a manner that could not be done otherwise. Many of the artists assigned assigned to the 628th have gone on to sterling careers at teaching universities and medical schools. The malpractice lawyers would be lost without the demonstrative evidence provided by the talented hands of the medical illustrators.

Attached to 406th Med Lab, the 628th Illustration Detachment produced an array of Anatomy Charts and posters for the Command.

 

Activated at Ft. Sam Houston, Texas in December, 1965 and attached to US Army Hospital, Camp Zama in January, 1966. Provided stablizing dialysis in a field environment prior to evacuation of patient to a general treatment center in CONUS.

629th Medical Detachment (RENAL)

 

In early 1963, the U.S. Medical Department formed the Renal Detachment to treat Acute Renal Failure (ARF) in future conflicts. The 629th Medical Detachment (RENAL) was activated in December, 1965 at Fort Sam Houston, TX. It arrived in Japan on 23 January, 1966 and was assigned by USARJ GO 29, dated 27 January, 1966 to the Headquarters, USAMCJ, with attachment to US Army Hospital, Camp Zama, for administrative and logistical support.

In April, 1966, two Nephrologists, three nurses, and seven technicians from the 629th were attached to the 3rd Field Hospital in Saigon, Vietnam to provide support to ARF patients and to demonstrate that ARF could be treated in with dialysis in a field hospital setting. The U.S. Army had used dialysis successfully in Korea, decreasing the mortality rate by 53-60%The 3rd Field contingent decreased the mortality rate further by an additional 13%. They would provide initial stablelyzing dialysis before evacuating the casualty either to Japan or CONUS

Lessons learned from Korea and Vietnam and in several natural disasters will aid us in preparing for future conflicts and natural disasters. Readiness training is an essential part of our fellowship programs in disaster relief.

US Army Depot Command, Sagami

The U. S. Army Depot Command, Japan, was organized on 1 July 1966 by U. S. Army Japan General Order No.167, dated 18 July 1966

The U. S. Army Depot Command, Japan, often called Sagami Depot, is a former Japanese military establishment. The Sixth Arsenal of the Imperial Japanese Army was established in 1935 and later became known as the Sagami Army Arsenal. During World War II, the Sagami Arsenal was one of the largest industrial developments constr (11th Evacuation Hospital)

Camp Drew was located adjacent to the community of Koizuma-Oto in Kumagaya-ken Prefecture, some one hour north of Tokyo, by train. The hospital was located in a building utilized by the Japanese during World War II as a kamikazi aircraft manufacturing plant. The building still contained the large elevators which were used to ferry aircraft and/or parts from one level to another when it was converted into a US Army Hospital. These same elevators were used to transport patients from one floor to the next. The living quarters were huge open bays, previously used for aircraft and/or parts manufacture.

The hospital staff at the 11th Evac. supported the 1st Cavalry Division after the 1st had been transferred out of Korea to nearby Camp Whittington. After approximately three year tenure back in Japan, the 11th was deactivated in mid 1958. Personnel from the 11th were sent to US Army Hospital, Camp Zama.

While in Japan, the 11th supported the Karuizawa Orphanage through financial and material assistance. The orphanage was headed by Japanese Catholic Sister Celeste and often the hospital staff member took a four truck convoy onto the orphanage with presents, food, and clothing for ucted by the Japanese Government to manufacture tanks for their armies. In addition to the construction of hundreds of buildings, elaborate tunnels and underground excavations were devised to accommodate the more critical and vulnerable activities.

On 1 May 1959 the General Depot organization was discontinued and the installation renamed the U. S. Army Japan Depot Complex. The principal effect of the reorganization was to place the executive direction of the supply and maintenance activities of the technical services with the chiefs of those services at Headquarters, U. S. Army Japan. It remained in this organizational posture until the organization of the U. S. Army Depot, Japan on 11 March 1963 under General Order No.10, dated 7 Mar 1963, which discontinued the technical services logistic system at Sagami.

On 1 July 1966, the U. S. Army Depot, Japan was redesignated the U. S. Army Depot Command, Japan Simultaneously, the mission and functions of the U. S. Army Logistical Center Japan (USALCJ) were transferred to this Command

On 1 May 1959 the General Depot organization was discontinued and the installation renamed the U. S. Army Japan Depot Complex. The principal effect of the reorganization was to place the executive direction of the supply and maintenance activities of the technical services with the chiefs of those services at Headquarters, U. S. Army Japan. It remained in this organizational posture until the organization of the U. S. Army Depot, Japan on 11 March 1963 under General Order No.10, dated 7 Mar 1963, which discontinued the technical services logistic system at Sagami.

On 1 July 1966, the U. S. Army Depot, Japan was re-designated the U. S. Army Depot Command, Japan Simultaneously, the mission and functions of the U. S. Army Logistical Center Japan (USALCJ) were transferred to this Command. Logistical support of U. S. Forces, PACOM MAP countries, AID missions, Free World Military Assistance Forces and civil governments were thereby combined under a single command responsibility.

The former USALCJ, located at Tokorozawa city, Saitama prefecture was a Japanese Air Force Base during World War II and also the cite of the oldest airfield in Japan. The Fuchu Ordnance Depot and Tokorozawa Ordnance Sub-Depot were established in 194& to store and repair general purpose vehicles.

Entrance to  Depot

Sagami Depot Overhead

 

Map of Sagami Complex

 

Old Depot Complex

Now Private Rentals

 

 

Fuchinobe Complex

 

Camp Drake in Asaka - Home of 249th General Hospital

 

 

 

249th  General Hospital From a Distance

249th General Hospital

On 30 December, 1965, the 249th General Hospital became operational at Camp Drake in Asaka. Asaka is situated just northwest of Tokyo. The Drake hospital facility consisted of 23 buildings. In June, 1965, 4 old warehouse buildings had been converted to a modern health facility at a cost of $2.3 million. Ground-breaking ceremonies were held the first week in October, 1966 for a new 400-man barracks to be built for 249th personnel.

The core of the hospital was designed such that it could be expanded to 2000 beds. The hospital operated as 1000-bed facility and they received and treated approximately 1000 patients each month and evacuated or returned to duty slightly less than that number during the peak years.
 

Five years after it's opening, patient care ceased at the 249th and they moved into caretaker status on 14 January, 1971. At the time of inactivation, medical assets of the 249th General Hospital amounted to approximately $1.4 million. Of this amount, $500,000 worth of materials were transferred to Korea, Camp Zama, Camp Kue, Okinawa, Thailand, Philippines, and Hawaii. The balance of $932,000 was retained for contingency operations.
 

The 249th resurfaced at Fort Gordon, GA, as part of the 44th Medical Brigade, which was headquartered at Fort Bragg, NC. As part of the 44th Med. Bd., the unit participated in numerous campaigns and operations other than war. It deactivated in 2006.

Originally, Camp Drake formed part of an Imperial Japanese Army training facility; it was taken over by the US Army at the end of World War II. The post is named after Colonel Royce A. Drake, who was killed in action while commanding the 5th Cavalry during the liberation of the Philippines. Colonel Drake was killed in action on Leyte in 1945......

106th General Hospital

The 106th General Hospital set up operation at Kishine Barracks in Yokohama on 29 December, 1965, and became the Burn Center for the Far East, taking over the responsibility that once belonged to US Army Hospital, Camp Zama. Burn patients from Vietnam, as well as, Korea, Thailand, and other countries were transported to the 106th. The 106th averaged treating close to 1000 new patients each month. The total area where the hospital once stood is now a park and is called Kashine Koen. The 106th and all its buildings are gone. All that is left is the baseball field. The 20 ft wall that once stood has been replaced with a 6 ft wall. The ground below is the concrete from the buildings that once belonged to the 106th. Four-story & five-story buildings have replaced the razed buildings of the 106th. At the bottom of the hill where the hospital once stood is a Martial Arts building.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

The Remains Of Kishine Barracks, Photo Taken in 2000

Street That Ran By Where the 106th General Hospital Once Stood.

Apartments Now Stand Where Kishine Barracks Once Stood.

Aerial Photo Kishine Barracks (106th General Hospital 1966 (Taken By Stars & Stripes Photographer)

Aerial View Of Kishine Barracks and The 106th General Hospital, 1966

Hospital Entrance

U.S. Army Hospital, Camp Drew

(11th Evacuation Hospital)

Camp Drew was located adjacent to the community of Koizuma-Oto in Kumagaya-ken Prefecture, some one hour north of Tokyo, by train. The hospital was located in a building utilized by the Japanese during World War II as a kamikazi aircraft manufacturing plant. The building still contained the large elevators which were used to ferry aircraft and/or parts from one level to another when it was converted into a US Army Hospital. These same elevators were used to transport patients from one floor to the next. In addition to the construction of hundreds of buildings, elaborate tunnels and underground excavations were devised to accommodate the more critical and vulnerable activities. The living quarters were huge open bays, previously used for aircraft and/or parts manufacture.

The hospital staff at the 11th Evac. supported the 1st Cavalry Division after the 1st had been transferred out of Korea to nearby Camp Whittington. After approximately three year tenure back in Japan, the 11th was deactivated in mid 1958. Personnel from the 11th were sent to US Army Hospital, Camp Zama.

While in Japan, the 11th supported the Karuizawa Orphanage through financial and material assistance. The orphanage was headed by Japanese Catholic Sister Celeste and often the hospital staff member took a four truck convoy onto the orphanage with presents, food, and clothing for ucted by the Japanese Government to manufacture tanks for their armies. In addition to the construction of hundreds of buildings, elaborate tunnels and underground excavations were devised to accommodate the more critical and vulnerable activities.

For comprehensive history of 11th Evacuation Hospital Click Here

 

118th US Army Hospital

(Fukuoka, Japan)

 

The photo of the 118th Army Hospital at Fukuoka was supplied by our newest member, Amy Ballard, who was born at this hospital in 1956. A large majority of all patients evacuated from Korea in July, 1950 arrive first at the 118th Stationj Hospital which is located in southern Japan, a short distance aceoss the Korean Strait from the 8054th Evacuation Hospital, located southeast of Pusan. This hospital rapidly expanded as it assumed the function of Triage for the patients transferred to other hospitals in Japan or CONUS.

 

Major Bailey of the 118th Station Hospital was caught up in the flow of incoming patients, as was his counterpart, Captain Krause of the 8054th Evac. Hospital. Also, he could do little in establishing a treatment program since beds were available only to nontransportable patients. Further, he was needed in the sorting and triage of patients from Korea as the small medical staff worked around the clock to keep patients moving north so that other incominng casualties could be processed. Major Baily stated that he managed to return 10% of the psychiatric evacuees back to combat duty but triaged the remainder to the 361st Station Hospital in Tokyo.

 

The 118th closed in 1957. It treated patients throughout the Korean Conflict. The hospital was turned back over to the Japanese.

 

 

118th US Army Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan

   

361st Station Hospital

(Tokyo, Japan)

 

On 15 July, 1950, LTC Arthur Hessin, MC (completed psychiatric residency and became Board eligible) arrived to join the 361st staff as Chief of the Neuropsychiatry Service. He was followed soon thereafter by a second: LTC Oswald Weaver (completed 3 years of Army psychiatry residency and was Board eligible. An internist, Captain Fancy, and a general medical officer, Captain Dermott Smith, who desired psychiatry training were added to the neuropsychiatry staff which included two other psychiatrists, Colonel Eaton Bennett and LTC Ray Clausen. Physical facilities were expanded to include the adjoining detachment barracks which became an annex mainly for the Neuropsychiatry Service whose census averaged 500 to 600 for August and September, 1950. Somewhat over 50% of psychiatry admissions to the 361st Station Hospital during this period were evacuated to Zone 1 as the  lack of bed space and other problems apparently forced this means of disposition.

 

602nd Medical Detachment (Ambulance)

 

The 602nd Medical Detachment (Ambulance) became a part of USAMCJ in January, 1966. The unit deployed from Fort Polk, LA. Commanded by Captain Shoumaker, the unit aided the war effort in Vietnam by transporting patients by ground ambulance to and from evacuation aircraft to the varoius treatment facilitiesn in Japan, i.e. US Army Hospital, Camp Zama; 106th Gen. Hospital, Kishine Barracks; 249th Gen. Hospital, Camp Drake; and US Army Hospital, Camp Oji. Often they had to administer IVs and control bleeding during a bumpy ride down uneven roads. After the slow down and eventual end of the Vietnam conflict, the 602nd resurfaced at part of the 44th Medical Brigade at Fort Bragg. They are now in Iraq, supporting the conflict  there.

(602nd currently supporting war effort in Iraq)

 

141st General Hospital

 

The history of the 141st General Hospital was supplied by one of our newest members, SFC  Retired Bruce Rathbun. To view this info click here